Ask a TRI Expert

TRI Alliance Technical Brief: Recommendations for Tile Penetrations

Throughout a concrete tile roof’s lifespan, a homeowner may decide to have a roof accessory installed, such as solar panels, that requires the installer to modify the roof system in order to properly fasten the accessory onto the roof deck. Doing so should not affect the long-term performance of the tile roof system as long as proper flashings are used. In order to help provide greater clarity to contractors and installers on this practice, the Tile Roofing Industry Alliance (TRIA), a non-profit association of producers and associates of concrete and clay tile, has provided the following recommendations:

In instances in which roofing contractors, or third-party vendors, must modify roof tiles in a manner that is inconsistent with the roofing industry-based installation recommendations, it shall be noted that all penetrations require an approved deck/underlayment flashing and tile flashing.

A penetration, for this purpose, shall be defined as:

When an object is fastened to or through the roof sheathing and protrudes through or alters the underlayment and/or roof tile, that object is a penetration through the roof system and requires flashings.

This tile flashing recommendation is consistent with good roofing and flashing practices and roofing standard methods prescribed in the TRI/WSRCA Concrete and Clay Roof Tile Installation Manual on page 18, Detail MC-02, Note 2, which states: “All penetrations require a deck and tile flashing.” The tile roofing industry also covers penetration-flashing recommendations in our Florida High Wind Concrete and Clay Tile Installation Manual on Drawing FHW-08.

In addition to the aforementioned recommendations made by the TRIA, local building codes should be reviewed as the job site area’s building officials will be the final authority.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding the addition of roof accessories, such as solar panels, to a concrete tile roof, please contact your local Eagle Account Representative.

Ask a TRI Expert: Can a cement tile be fastened too tight?

Have you ever wondered what types of questions people “Ask a TRI Expert“? This series, brought to you by the Tile Roofing Institute, allows anyone to ask anything about tile roofing installation, maintenance, etc. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) is a non-profit association of producers and associates of concrete and clay tile and is considered one of the leading experts in the industry. Here’s a recent question from a homeowner and the response from TRI President and Technical Director, Rick Olson.

Question

Can a cement tile be fastened too tight? And would that cause breakage?

Response

The simple answer is yes, but that depends upon the type of fastening and if the fasteners are over driven. Tiles can be fastened with nails, screws or foam adhesive products. The ability of the fastener to provide the greatest uplift resistance will come from the fastener being relatively flush to the top of the tile. For nails, that can be with a hammer or a nail gun.

With a hammer, if they are over driven, the hammer can hit the top of the tile and can create a crack around the nail hole, or in some cases break the tile.

With nail guns, the roofing contractor will set the “chuck stroke” or height to be just above the tile surface to prevent over driving of the nail or screw. This should eliminate any chance of tile breakage.

When screws are used with an impact gun, contractors will generally set the resistance of the chuck to allow the screw to go flush. This will prevent the screw from stripping out the wood and will also provide the best uplift resistance. The goal is to have the fastener seat to the top surface of the tile. If fasteners are too high, they will create a point load on the overlapping tile that can result in breakage when the tiles are walked on.

If you have any questions regarding concrete tile or installation, the Tile Roofing Institute’s website, www.tileroofing.org, is a great resource. TRI also offers installation certification courses throughout the United States, so be sure to check their 2019 course schedule to register for one in your area!

Please feel free to contact your local Eagle Account Representative with questions or visit our website at www.eagleroofing.com.

 

Ask a TRI Expert: Underlayment

Have you ever wondered what types of questions people “Ask a TRI Expert?” This series, brought to you by the Tile Roofing Institute, allows anyone to ask anything about tile roofing installation, maintenance, etc. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) is a non-profit association of producers and associates of concrete and clay tile and is considered one of the leading experts in the industry. Here’s a recent question from a roofer repairing a concrete tile roof, and the response from TRI President and Technical Director, Rick Olson.

Question

“On a re-roofing project, if the underlayment is not deteriorated or buckled can you go over it with new underlayment?”

Response

“A good question. Without seeing the roof, it is hard to know the actual condition of the underlayment. As the secondary barrier for water shedding, care needs to be taken to make sure that the underlayment is in good shape prior to re-installing tile over it. The reason is that the tiles will last longer than the house, but the long-term performance of the secondary barrier will determine the life cycle of the roofing assembly.

If you are re-roofing and already have the tiles removed, it is the time to replace, since there are minimal costs to remove and replace. If the roof underlayment is relatively new and appears to be OK, then yes, it is allowed by most code jurisdictions to install an additional layer. If there were problems and you add that layer, you are just covering a potential future issue.”

If you have any questions regarding concrete tile or installation, the Tile Roofing Institute’s website, www.tileroofing.org, is a great resource. TRI also offers installation certification courses throughout the United States, so be sure to check their course schedule to register for one in your area!

Please feel free to contact your local Eagle Account Representative with questions or visit our website at www.eagleroofing.com.

 

How to Find a TRI Certified Roofing Contractor

Finding a certified tile roofing professional to install your concrete tile roof doesn’t have to be as difficult as you think. In fact, you can find one at the click of a button by visiting the Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) website.

The TRI is a non-profit association of producers and associates of concrete and clay tile, and is considered to be one of the leading experts in the industry. The organization’s “Find a Contractor” page allows you to search for a TRI Certified 

contractor, manufacturer, supplier, inspector or consultant in your area. If a business is listed on the map, that means at least one employee has undergone one of two of the certification classes TRI offers and passed the 50-question exam. The two courses offered are the Installation Manual Certification course, which is offered in all states except for Florida, and the Florida High Wind Manual Certification course, which is exclusive to Florida. The certification is valid for two years and can be renewed online or in person.

Upon visiting the webpage, you will see the listings include company contact information and the names of the employees that have obtained the certification for your convenience. Rest assured that the map is up to date and companies are removed from the contractor search if all employee certifications have expired.

If you need additional assistance or tips for hiring the right roofing contractor for your concrete tile roof installation, visit the Eagle Roofing Products’ blog or contact your local Eagle Account Representative.

How to Find a TRI Certified Roofing Contractor

Finding a certified tile roofing professional to install your concrete tile roof doesn’t have to be as difficult as you think. In fact, you can find one at the click of a button by visiting the Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) website.

The TRI is a non-profit association of producers and associates of concrete and clay tile, and is considered to be one of the leading experts in the industry. The organization’s “Find a Contractor” page allows you to search for a TRI Certified contractor, manufacturer, supplier, inspector or consultant in your area. If a business is listed on the map, that means at least one employee has undergone one of two of the certification classes TRI offers and passed the 50-question exam. The two courses offered are the Installation Manual Certification course, which is offered in all states except for Florida, and the Florida High Wind Manual Certification course, which is exclusive to Florida. The certification is valid for two years and can be renewed online or in person.

Upon visiting the webpage, you will see the listings include company contact information and the names of the employees that have obtained the certification for your convenience. Rest assured that the map is up to date and companies are removed from the contractor search if all employee certifications have expired.

If you need additional assistance or tips for hiring the right roofing contractor for your concrete tile roof installation, visit the Eagle Roofing Products’ blog or contact your local Eagle Account Representative.

Ask a TRI Expert: Roof Protection with Tiles & Underlayment

Have you ever wondered what types of questions people “Ask a TRI Expert“? This series, brought to you by the Tile Roofing Institute, allows anyone to ask anything about tile roofing installation, maintenance, etc. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) is a non-profit association of producers and associates of concrete and clay tile and is considered one of the leading experts in the industry. Here’s a recent question from a homeowner repairing their concrete tile roof, and the response from TRI President and Technical Director, Rick Olson.

Question:

“Recently during Hurricane Matthew a few of my Spanish style concrete tiles were damaged, cracked with some pieces missing. When the roofer showed up to repair the roof I was told that the tiles were only cosmetic and the real roof protection is underneath. I’m sure water gets under the tiles but I would think that most of the protection is from the tiles-70% or more. What is the truth about these roof tiles?”

Response:

“Historically (early 1900’s-1960) tiles that were installed were generally handmade or from home style manufacturing machines. With the low roof pitches in Florida, the wind driven rain could be allowed to enter the roof system, so the concept of a fully sealed roof system was used. 30-pound roofing felt was installed and a hot mopped 90 lb. cap sheet was applied. The tiles were then installed to prevent the UV from breaking down the underlayment.

Fast forward to the tiles made after about 1965. They were manufactured with newer high speed machines utilizing European technology that made a very dense tile that would prevent water intrusion through the tile (permeability) and allow tiles to become the primary water shedding component. In Europe, they were actually installed for centuries without any roof sheathing or underlayment, until recently.

The use of the sealed underlayment under the tile in Florida has continued over time because it provides a very good secondary barrier in the event there is either wind driven rain, or damage to the tiles during an event.

In summary, you are correct in your thoughts, but the stories passed down to roofing contractors carries the old thought from when tiles were not made to the newer standards. That said, there are still imported tiles that may not meet the requirements for permeability. All of the producing members of TRI will meet the criteria. If consumers choose to use an imported tile, we caution them to read and ask if the imported tiles will perform as the code requires.”

If you have any questions regarding concrete tile or installation, the Tile Roofing Institute’s website, www.tileroofing.org, is a great resource. TRI also offers installation certification courses throughout the United States, so be sure to check their course schedule to register for one in your area!

Please feel free to contact your local Eagle Account Representative with questions or visit our website at www.eagleroofing.com.

ASK A TRI EXPERT: TITLE 24 AND TILE FASTENING

Have you ever wondered what types of questions people “Ask a TRI Expert“? This series, brought to you by the Tile Roofing Institute, allows anyone to ask anything about tile roofing installation, maintenance, etc. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) is a non-profit association of producers and associates of concrete and clay tile and is considered one of the leading experts in the industry. Here’s a recent question from a homeowner repairing their concrete tile roof, and the response from TRI President and Technical Director, Rick Olson.

Question:

“I have a contractor who is trying to meet Title 24 requirements on a new project. They are asking about installing 1/2″ Polyiso insulation over the roof sheathing before applying 2-layers of 30# felt and concrete S-tile.

We have never installed insulation this way. It seems that having to nail the tile through the insulation to get to the plywood sheathing would detract from the holding strength of the nails. Can you let me know if this would be acceptable to install a tile roof with this system or do they need to find another way to meet their T-24 requirements?”

Response:

“As you have identified, title 24 does create some challenges for the roofing professional. In essence there are prescriptive and design options for meeting the requirements that include the building design, A/C, lights windows and roof systems. For tile, they have generally been met through using higher solar reflective colors that have been formally rated by the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC). The air space above the sheathing called the Above Sheathing Ventilation (ASV), will also increase the thermal barrier and has an R-value in the equation. With some designers, they are trying to maximize additional benefits by looking to add thermal radiant barriers either above or below the sheathing. In your case they are trying to add insulative board above the sheathing.

The challenge is that such materials are not code approved substrates for our tiles to attach to. The fasteners would need to be of sufficient length to penetrate 3/4” into the actual sheathing. We call these pre-engineered systems and look to the manufacturer of the insulation board to provide proper fastening requirements.

As the tile industry, we have done extensive uplift testing on traditional fasteners into plywood, but do not have testing to support the use with Polyiso style of insulation materials. We have raised our concerns to the California Energy Commission to look beyond just the radiative properties and review the actual installation requirements for wind, fire, and seismic code requirements as well.

I hope this helps answer your question. I know it is a little more detail than required, but it helps show the challenges we are facing as the Title 24 raises the thresholds.

In summary, we do not have a formal installation detail for the installation you are referring to. The local building official may have established criteria for use, but would suggest you ask the designer to call out the length and size of fastener they would require. The best result would be to just use tile and if they wish additional levels, use a radiant barrier underneath the sheathing.”

If you have any questions regarding concrete tile or installation, the Tile Roofing Institute’s website, www.tileroofing.org, is a great resource. TRI also offers installation certification courses throughout the United States, so be sure to check their course schedule to register for one in your area!

Please feel free to contact your local Eagle Account Representative with questions or visit our website at www.eagleroofing.com.

Ask a TRI Expert: Repairing a Tile Roof

Have you ever wondered what types of questions people “Ask a TRI Expert“? This series, brought to you by the Tile Roofing Institute, allows anyone to ask anything about tile roofing installation, maintenance, etc. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) is a non-profit association of producers and associates of concrete and clay tile and is considered one of the leading experts in the industry. Here’s a recent question from a home inspector, and the response from TRI President and Technical Director, Rick Olson.

Question:

“We are repairing our roof and I had two estimators. One said that he has to put cement on every tile. The other said no cement on tile because in cold places in winter it will crack the tile. Please let me know who is right and who is wrong.”

Response:

“In general tiles are currently fastened with nails, screws or adhesive foam. Mortar has been used in the past, but does have some challenges due to the physical properties of the mortar. A brief summary is that the density of the mortar will be different than the density of the tile. The expansion and contraction of the materials will be different and can create cracking or separation of the bonding of the tiles. In areas subject to freeze thaw, the moisture in the mortar can expand when frozen and crack the mortar. In most areas, when mortar is used, it is for the aesthetic effects such as adding an additional lift (boost) to the tile. In the Southeast (Florida) the use of mortar was in place for many years, but the effects of long term exposure to expansion and contraction did not allow the proper bonding to meet the new high wind code requirements and has been replaced with the use of Foam adhesives.

Location and climate conditions will impact the preferred method for repair. If you let us know where you are located we can provide more specific recommendations.”

If you have any questions regarding concrete tile or installation, the Tile Roofing Institute’s website, www.tileroofing.org, is a great resource. TRI also offers installation certification courses throughout the United States, so be sure to check their course schedule to register for one in your area!

Please feel free to contact your local Eagle Account Representative with questions or visit our website at www.eagleroofing.com.